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boards:sbc:sbc_v2:start [2020/12/01 05:17]
b1ackmai1er [SBC V2 (web pages currently being reformatted b1ackmai1er 25/11/2020)]
boards:sbc:sbc_v2:start [2020/12/02 08:39] (current)
b1ackmai1er [SBC V2]
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-====== SBC V2 (web pages currently being reformatted b1ackmai1er 1/12/2020) ======+====== SBC V2 ======
  
 The SBC V2 is a Zilog Z80 processor board. It's a 100x160mm board that is capable of functioning both as a standalone SBC or as attached to the ECB bus. The SBC V2 is a Zilog Z80 processor board. It's a 100x160mm board that is capable of functioning both as a standalone SBC or as attached to the ECB bus.
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 For most people, the [[:boards:sbc:sbc_v2:sbc_v2-004|SBC-V2-004]] offers the most convenience and functionality. For most people, the [[:boards:sbc:sbc_v2:sbc_v2-004|SBC-V2-004]] offers the most convenience and functionality.
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 +|{{https://www.retrobrewcomputers.org//lib/plugins/ckgedit/fckeditor/userfiles/image/boards/sbc/sbc_v2/photos/built-up-sbc-v2.jpg?nolink&200x149|www.retrobrewcomputers.org_lib_plugins_ckgedit_fckeditor_userfiles_image_boards_sbc_sbc_v2_photos_built-up-sbc-v2.jpg}}|{{https://www.retrobrewcomputers.org/lib/plugins/ckgedit/fckeditor/userfiles/image/boards/sbc/sbc_v2/sbc_v2-004/gallery/sbc-v2-004z.png?nolink&250x161}}|{{https://www.retrobrewcomputers.org/lib/plugins/ckgedit/fckeditor/userfiles/image/boards/sbc/sbc_v2/sbc_v2-005/gallery/sbc-v2-005f.png?nolink&250x161}}|
 +|[[:boards:sbc:sbc_v2:sbc_v2-003#sbc_v2-003a|sbc-v2-003A]]|[[:boards:sbc:sbc_v2:sbc_v2-004#sbc-v2-004|sbc-v2-004]]|[[:boards:sbc:sbc_v2:sbc_v2-005#sbc-v2-005_megaflash|sbc-v2-005f]]|
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-===== Serial Cable Instructions ===== 
- 
-The SBC V2 doesn't have any video capabilities in its solitary form. Therefore, in order to test it, you will need to connect it to a serial terminal (which will provide the keyboard input and monitor output). The easiest way to do this is to construct a cable which will provide a serial port (with a D-sub connector or DE-9 plug) which will plug into a “host” computer running a serial terminal emulation program. This program will allow you to interface with the SBC V2 board using the host computer’s keyboard and monitor. 
- 
-First, you must build a cable with an IDC-10 plug on one end (plastic rectangular connector with 2 rows of 5 pins) and a female DE-9 plug (ie. a serial port plug) on the other end. 
- 
-The female DE-9 plug is what you will plug into the serial port of your host computer. Serial ports (on the back of the computer) are male ports (ie. they have pins), so the plug at the end of this cable must be a female plug (they have holes). It's not recommended to use accessory serial cables to make this connection (such as null modem cables, etc.). This is because many such cables are wired for specific applications, and may not work with your SBC V2 board. For instance, a serial data transfer cable is wired very differently from a “straight-through” serial cable (pin 1 to 1, 2 to 2, etc.) which is different from a null modem cable. Because of this cable inconsistency, it's preferred to build the complete custom cable from the beginning knowing exactly what pin is connected where and why, and not to use any serial extension cables. The exception to this is using a serial cable that you know is wired as a “straight through” cable (with each pin on one plug connected to each pin on the other plug: 1 to 1, 2 to 2, etc). 
- 
-The following cable layout shows what is being connected where in this cable: 
- 
-^IDC-10 side^DE-9 side| 
-|2|4| 
-|3|3| 
-|5|2| 
-|7|6| 
-|9|5| 
- 
-Pin 1 on the IDC plug is marked with an embossed triangle on the plug, and this pin corresponds to pin 1 on the pcb which is marked with a square solder hole (at the lower-right most position of the plug on the SBC V2 pcb). The pins on the DE-9 plug are usually marked right on the plug itself in tiny numbers. Strip some wires and solder away. Instead of stripping wires and soldering manually, you can also use ribbon cable and special "direct connect" plugs that connect directly to the ribbon cable without soldering (they have rows of metal "pins" that press down and penetrate the ribbon cable to make the connections). Because of the non-standard pin connections that are needed in this cable (per the above table), however, you will likely need to do some soldering or “custom connecting”. 
- 
-Always double and triple check where you’re soldering something before you solder it. When you’ve built your cable, use your multimeter to check connectivity between each pin on the IDC-10 side and the DE-9 side according to the arrangement above to make sure you got it right. 
- 
-In order to test connections in a plug you cannot stick the multimeter lead into the hole (because it will not fit). Instead, take a spare piece of wire, stick it into the hole for the pin you want to test, and then touch the multimeter lead to that wire. 
- 
-==== Flow control considerations: ==== 
- 
-ROMWBW will automatically identify the type of serial chip installed. Depending on the capability of the serial chip, flow control may or may not be available. Chip data sheets cannot be relied upon to accurately identify the chips capability. 
- 
-In the absence of flow control, guidelines for baud rate settings are: 
- 
-4Mhz CPU Crystal - 38400 baud 
- 
-8Mhz CPU Crystal - 57600 baud 
- 
-Baud rate can be changed using the CP/M MODE program i.e. [[:software:firmwareos:romwbw:apps|MODE ]]COM0:57600,8,N,1 /P 
- 
-If garbled characters are seen on the display or serial file transfers fail, a lower baud rate should be tried. 
- 
- 
- 
-===== Software ===== 
- 
-There is extensive firmware support for the SBC V2 and associated ECB peripheral cards. Currently there are two firmware builds still being actively developed - UNA and ROMWBW. 
- 
-See [[:software:firmwareos:start#active_projects|here]] for current software builds and information on historical projects. 
- 
-A debug boot ROM can be installed for testing - try James Moxham's ROMIMAGE.BIN from [[:software:firmwareos:jm:start|here]]. 
- 
-[[https://www.retrobrewcomputers.org/lib/exe/fetch.php?tok=fdd6b4&media=https://www.retrobrewcomputers.org/lib/plugins/ckgedit/fckeditor/userfiles/image/boards/sbc/sbc_v2/romimage.png|{{https://www.retrobrewcomputers.org/lib/plugins/ckgedit/fckeditor/userfiles/image/boards/sbc/sbc_v2/romimage.png?direct&467x384}}]] 
- 
-==== REAL TIME CLOCK (RTC) ==== 
- 
-The DS1302 real time clock can be set under CP/M using the **rtc** utility program. 
-<code> 
-Loading CPM... 
-CP/M-80 Version 2.2C for the N8VEM, October 2008 
-Run XM from A drive, this downloads file to B drive 
-A>rtc 
-Start RTC Program 
-RTC: Version 1.0 
-RTC: Commands: E)xit T)ime st(A)rt S)et R)aw L)oop C)harge N)ocharge D)elay I)nit G)et P)ut H)elp 
-RTC: trickle charger disabled. 
-RTC> 
-</code> 
- 
-Set the time and date with the** //Init// **command first and then use the //**Set**//  command to program it. 
- 
-RTC.COM can also be used to set up trickle charging for the backup battery or super capacitor if connected. More Information on charging Super Capacitors can be found here: [[https://www.maximintegrated.com/en/design/tools/calculators/product-design/supercap.cfm|https://www.maximintegrated.com/en/design/tools/calculators/product-design/supercap.cfm]] 
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-The utility can also set and read the RTC memory. 
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-[[:software:firmwareos:romwbw:apps|RTC.COM ]]is part of Wayne Warthen's [[https://github.com/wwarthen/RomWBW|ROMWBW]] package. 
- 
- 
- 
-===== One Bit Input Port ===== 
- 
-Bit 6 of RTC port $70 is connect to an on board jumper JP2 which can be read by software. By default it is tied high. Removing jumper JP2 will result in the being tied low (=0). 
- 
-Effectively this creates a configurable jumper setting which the ROMWBW bootrom can use for determining the primary communications console. 
- 
-This facility is not enabled by default in ROMWBW and the setting is ignored. To enable, rebuild the ROMWBW package with the CRTACT setting set to true. The CRT type can also be configured at this time: 
  
-<font inherit/Courier New,Courier,monospace;;inherit;;inherit>SBC_std_cust.asm</font> 
  
-<code> 
-CRTACT        .SET    TRUE           ; CRT ACTIVATION AT STARTUP 
-VDAEMU        .SET    EMUTYP_ANSI    ; DEFAULT VDA EMULATION (EMUTYP_TTY, EMUTYP_ANSI, ...) 
-</code> 
  
-This will cause ROMWBW to check the status of BIT 6 at startup. If "0" (jumper removed) it will change the primary communications console from the Serial UART to the first CRT console found. If a CRT console is not found it will default back to the Serial UART. If BIT 6 = "1" (jumper in place) it will boot as normal with the primary console using the Serial UART. 
  
  
boards/sbc/sbc_v2/start.1606817850.txt.gz · Last modified: 2020/12/01 05:17 by b1ackmai1er
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